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Dual-classing, number of TOTAL proficiencies

Hey, everyone -- I've googled this, but all I can find are answers that I already know, about how proficiency points *overlap* when you dual-class. What I actually want to know is how many *total* proficiency points you get when you dual.

I've done a L9 Berserker > L30 Mage, who got 7 fighter points and 6 mage points, for 13. But I'm wondering if I really understand how other duals work.

For example, I'm thinking about a LoB run and starting with a Totemic Druid (for the early summons) who will dual to fighter after level 11. The Druid would have 4 proficiency points by that time; but she could then go up to L39 fighter, which as a single class would be 17 points. Does that really mean that character would end up with 21 points, more than a single-class fighter? That doesn't sound right.

Same question with a L13 Kensai > Thief. Kensai would get 8 before dualing, but could then go up to L39 thief, which would be another 11. Total of 19, again better than a single-class fighter?

Thanks for any help from people who know these builds.

Comments

  • Silver_ArrowSilver_Arrow Member Posts: 22
    edited April 22
    Its like no matter how many times you can say "I'm proficient with this weapon" it won't make you "Specialized" in it :wink:

    If you distribute proficiency points without overlapping them then you will get more of them, yes. Thac0 unfortunately will be chosen from the class which provides a better thac0.
    Post edited by Silver_Arrow on
  • jmerryjmerry Member Posts: 2,644
    Just remember the diminishing returns. You can't use more than 13 proficiency points at a time, after all (grandmastery in two weapons, mastery in dual-wielding style). The total number of points isn't really as important as how fast you can master your chosen weapons and styles.

    For fighter-X duals, delaying actual level-ups until you can complete the dual all at once and assign the proficiencies as a fighter is a useful trick. Or even the more complicated scheme that can earn a fighter-thief dual grand mastery under the BG1 XP cap - I like this one for Shar-Teel.

    Your basic math is correct. A dual class can get more total proficiency points than even a full warrior.
  • WatchForWolvesWatchForWolves Member Posts: 174
    mijo wrote: »
    For example, I'm thinking about a LoB run and starting with a Totemic Druid (for the early summons) who will dual to fighter after level 11. The Druid would have 4 proficiency points by that time; but she could then go up to L39 fighter, which as a single class would be 17 points. Does that really mean that character would end up with 21 points, more than a single-class fighter? That doesn't sound right.

    It does sound right when you remember how much more XP higher levels require compared to lower levels. Going from level 39 to 40 as a Fighter takes as much as XP as going from level 1 to 9.

    Also remember that as a Druid you will be limited by Druid proficiences - and only able to put one pip in them.
  • SelerelSelerel Member Posts: 168
    You are thinking about it absolutely correctly, yes a Totemic Druid (11)>Fighter will end up with 21 proficiency points vs. a Level 40 Fighter with just 17. One of the benefits of dual-classing. Obviously as the poster above said, you won't be able to start dumping more than one point into a weapon skill until you become a fighter, and you run the risk of overlapping/wasting points if you don't remember where you put your druid points when you're a lvl 1-11 fighter.

    But you'll be able to get up to 5 points too with a dual class which is a big advantage they have over multi-classes.
  • mijomijo Member Posts: 2
    edited April 29
    Thanks for your help, everyone. I know not to overlap, and it’s no big deal to put four druid proficiencies into clubs, slings, single-weapon, and dual-wield, then switch to GMing scimitars as a fighter till I complete the dual and don’t have to worry about overlapping any more. I mostly wanted to know if my overall calculations were right — I feel like it’s a good idea to plan everything out in advance for an LoB run — and you all helped with that.

    I also stumbled across something that said that BG actually made a mistake when it allowed duals from fighter to other classes to continue GMing once they finish the dual. I never played tabletop D&D, but if that’s the original 2e rule, it makes more sense from a role-playing perspective. I was confused about why an F>T can GM more weapons than someone who devoted themselves to pure fighting for their entire career . . . but if all the thief proficiencies were supposed to be limited to one point in thief weapons, then the 13F>39T would never be able to out-GM a pure 40F, whether they had more overall proficiencies or not.

    I hadn’t heard about that Shar-teel scheme. These games are fabulous, with the sheer range of tactics (and exploits) they allow.
    Post edited by mijo on
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