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Way off topic: Having trouble with my GPU

ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
So this isn't really the place for this post but I am not a member of any forums where this would be a good thing to post.

My GPU (Graphics card) fan has decided its about at the end of its life and its making a rather irritating buzzing/grinding noise so I am probably going to need a replacement.

I was wondering if anyone more techy orientated than me (I used to be but I lost track of everything) could recommend a good "modern" low cost alternative to my current graphics card.

My PC currently has in it a nVidia GT 520 Graphics card in it. I would like to stick with nVidia as I have always found them reliable (this is the first nVidia GPU that's gave me trouble).
I can budget somewhere in the region of 50 to 60 pounds (I guess that would be around 70 to 80 dollars?) for a new one.

Thanks peeps!

Comments

  • Troodon80Troodon80 Member, Developer Posts: 4,110
    edited March 2014
    £50-60? You'll be looking at one of the low-end GT series. You can find all of the nVidia cards listed here. Probably something like the GeForce GT 620. The GT 640 is a step up from the 620, but that would be at the upper end of your budget limit.

  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,456
    If you can stretch it to buy an AMD R7 250 (or HD7750) that'd be the best card in the £60 range. However, if you want to stick with what you know, the GT640 is your card.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-r7-240-and-250,3717-4.html

  • ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
    I know I am kinda super skint at the moment lol.

    I am thinking on THIS: http://www.ebuyer.com/407085-gigabyte-gt-640-900mhz-1800mhz-2gb-ddr3-dl-dvi-d-hdmi-pci-e-graphics-card-gv-n640oc-2gi

    Presuming that I can't get help fixing the noise problem lol. Some sites say that it is possible to repair by oiling (no idea how) or by replacing the fan (unable to get the darned thing unscrewed), and some places are like "yeah needs replacing"... So no clue.

    Teflon
  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,456
    That unit has GDDR3 which is quite antiquated. Of course the GDDR5 versions are more expensive.

    As for the old unit, you might as well try and fix it. You're going to have to buy a new one anyway so it doesn't matter if it breaks. However, if you do manage to fix it, you've saved some money. It's win-win.

    Troodon80jackjack
  • ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
    edited March 2014
    Again. Don't know how lol. Waiting to hear from the people that are the nVidia approved vendor for my GPU to get help.

    What would you recommend then FinneousPJ?

    Hmm.

    What is the difference here...

    http://www.ebuyer.com/434562-gigabyte-gt-640-2gb-gddr3-1800-mhz-dual-dvi-d-sub-hdmi-pci-e-ga-gv-n640oc-2gi

    and

    http://www.ebuyer.com/407085-gigabyte-gt-640-900mhz-1800mhz-2gb-ddr3-dl-dvi-d-hdmi-pci-e-graphics-card-gv-n640oc-2gi

    Totally confused...

    Post edited by ScotGaymer on
  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,456
    That card's fine for the price, I was just making an observation. There's a GDDR5 version with less but more modern memory http://www.ebuyer.com/546755-evga-gt640-1124mhz-5000mhz-1024mb-64-bit-ddr5-mini-hdmi-dvi-i-dvi-d-pci-e-01g-p3-2642-kr It's also more expensive. TBH with such a slow graphics processor I'm not sure if the memory type makes a huge difference, so you might just want to get the cheapest one.

    If I were you I'd just examine the unit to see what's wrong and try to fix it myself. It's just an electric fan.

  • Troodon80Troodon80 Member, Developer Posts: 4,110
    Just a small tutorial on the oiling aspect, in case anyone is interested.

    There should be four small screws on the reverse-side of the card to the fan itself that, when unscrewed, will allow the heatsink and fan to be removed. Some will have plastic clips instead. Below is a card I own, really old and it doesn't matter if it breaks. I don't even recall what model it is (it's not the same as yours), but it doesn't really matter since they all go together in a similar way.

    You can remove the fan and heatsink from the card:
    imageimage

    The second image there is the top of the card, not the side that actually has the fan on it.

    Typically, it will be removed as a block. You can unscrew a couple screws in order to remove the fan from the heatsink it is housed in:

    imageimage

    To actually oil the bearing, you will need to peel back the label on the back of the fan (do try not to rip it, but if you do just replace it with some tape). You should be able to see a small piece of metal, that's the fan spindle.

    image

    Use 3-in-1 oil, or light machine oil - do not use WD-40. Do try not to get oil on the actual circuity. Spin the fan a few times to make sure at least some of the oil penetrates properly. Once done, mount it and the heatsink on the card again, then put it into your computer and have a go. Whole thing should take around three or four minutes if you have the screwdriver and oil required.

    jackjack
  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,456
    Remember to reapply TIM when reinstalling. (thermal interface material, aka thermal paste)

  • Troodon80Troodon80 Member, Developer Posts: 4,110

    Remember to reapply TIM when reinstalling. (thermal interface material, aka thermal paste)

    If I'm honest, the first couple of steps are unnecessary and so thermal compound is not required. You should be able to remove the fan without removing the heatsink—in such a case, you can skip right to removing the fan while the heatsink is still attached. Removing the heat sink just makes it easier since it becomes less cumbersome and only takes a few seconds in most cases.

  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,456
    It's still a good idea to reapply it, since it often hardens with age and stops working optimally.

  • ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
    i have no idea where to get thermal interface paste?

    also according to the internet newhere from 30 to 90 degrees C is a safe temperature for a GPU (lower is better obv), according to GPU-Z my fan is working at 40% and its temp is 39C. so I felt safe enough unplugging the heat sink temporarily for some respite from the damn sound.

    its really that loud and annoying.

    and according to GPU-Z the temp is sitting steady at 42C.

    so I am okay for a short time until I can get this darned fan off.

    I tried unscrewing it but the screws wouldnt turn. :(

  • Troodon80Troodon80 Member, Developer Posts: 4,110
    @fitscotgaymer,

    I tried unscrewing it but the screws wouldnt turn. :(

    Forgive the possibly sarcastic sounding reply, but try harder. Most people are afraid that they'll break something, but the card is durable enough. When dealing with this stuff, there is a difference between being forceful and being aggressive. Don't be aggressive, be forceful but careful. Make sure you also have the correct size screwdriver.

    Like I said above, you actually don't need to remove the heatsink from the card, so if those screws will not turn then do not worry about it. Try the ones holding the fan in place, assuming you can access them (screws hidden by the heatsink are the worst, and in which case you will need to remove the heatsink).

  • ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
    No i can get the heatsink off with little trouble. But the fan just will not budge. I gouged a deep cut into my palm trying to get the screws to turn.

    To be honest I think it's a combo of being a weak nerd and having crappy cheap screw drivers lol.

    jackjack
  • Troodon80Troodon80 Member, Developer Posts: 4,110
    @fitscotgaymer, can't help there. One thing I would suggest is not holding the heatsink in your hand whilst trying to undo the screw. Put in on a table, counter top, or, if available, a surface that will not damage (or you will not care if it gets damaged) if you bog a screwdriver into it. Make sure the screwdriver is upright, and put as much downward pressure on it as you can (to make sure it doesn't jump. If you're using the wrong sized screwdriver, then you are only going to destroy the head of the screw and make it impossible to undo). Hold the heatsink with your fingers to keep it steady (as opposed to holding the heatsink, having the screwdriver jump and slide; driving it through your hand).

    If you have a screwdriver set which contains a similar screwdriver to the one I have above (got a set of them from B&Q for about a fiver many years ago, broke a couple so I got another set from Maplin), then it shouldn't be a problem.

    If you cannot get it undone, then I'm all out of suggestions and it goes back to the original question about what new card to get. My suggestion would be the GT 640, depending on how much you have to spend and how much you want to spend (two different things, obviously). You can get the Gigabyte GDDR5 version from Dabs UK for £58.35 (no idea about shipping), so that should be within your £50-60 budget.

    That's about all I have on the topic at hand. :-)

  • ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
    edited March 2014
    I have been in contact with the manufacturer/distributer of the cards KFA2 and they have said they are happy to declare the card faulty and do a replacement upgrade to a nVidia GT 620 for me for free. So happy about that :-).

    I just have to send them the card first. So ill be without my beloved PC for a few days or so.

    :-(

    jackjack
  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,456
    Nice, congrats on getting your way :D

  • ScotGaymerScotGaymer Member Posts: 526
    yeah just gotta wait for email to print off so i can send them it.

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