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Should I read or not?

Hi,

I am just starting Baldur's Gate EE, first time playing this series and even though I read some Dragonlance books I never read any Forgotten Realms books so I am compeletely new to this universe. (and never played a D&D game as video game or not).

So I opened the tutorial which seems fairly long and didn't finished it yet and there were a few things that I didn't understand so I searched them and found the answers but in the way I came across a few guides which suggested that I should read Unofficial Baldur's Gate EE manual. Usually I never read a manual to game just tutorial is enough. However I started to reading a few pages and noticed that manual gives a lot of information about universe.

Now my problem is that for me a catching point of a game or book or anyother storytelling piece is story and universe and if I learn about them before the game or etc. I am afraid that I won't be enjoying the game since I will be already know about Friendly Arm Inn etc. I love that when story comes by piece by piece in games or books. I don't like that somebody comes before I watch LoTR movies and tells me "Well, this is Middle Earth and there is a bad guy named Sauron at eastern side of this continent and there are humans, dwarfs..... and there is Gondor and Rohan...." it takes the excitement of learning a new thing about that driving story.


So should I read the manual and risk the losing excitement of this story or should I jump in the game after playing tutorial with less knowledge about mechanics and some important stuff?

This maybe an unimportant question to some of people but for me, I am really excited about this universe since it is so recommend from a lot of people about its story and mechanics. ( I am kind of a player that loves The Witcher since it has a great story and atmosphere even gameplay is sucks.)

So please help me at this dilemma xD.

Thank you very much of your time, sorry about some grammar or phrase mistakes, English is not my native language ^^.

Sincerely Mithra (king of gods :P)

Comments

  • elminsterelminster Member, Developer Posts: 16,050
    edited June 2015
    The funny thing about Baldur's Gate, especially the first game, is that over the years as I've read more of the universe expanding books (like Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast, Lands of Intrigue, the game manuals, and the Forgotten Realms Campaign Settings) I've gained an appreciation for just how many things Bioware actually incorporated into the game. I suppose a persons response to the game will ultimately depend on how strict they are when it comes to interpreting sourcebooks, but I generally would say that learning more about the universe only gives a greater appreciation for how much was included in the game. Plus it will give you a better understanding of the key players and organizations that are mentioned in the game (like the Zhents, Red Wizards, Flaming Fist, and Amn).

    JuliusBorisov
  • FrancoisFrancois Member Posts: 452
    I don't think you need to read books yet. You won't understand everything the first time, but you are discovering the universe just like your character is. After you played the game once you can go and read. I think it's more fun to read books after you played the game. Then you get to fill some of the blanks about the universe and the important persons. The Forgotten realms is very big and the game is set in a tiny part of it. You meet a few well-known figures but they're mostly brief cameos.

    Tuth
  • thelovebatthelovebat Member Posts: 218
    edited June 2015
    You shouldn't need to read any of the manuals or stuff like that before starting, as long as you have a general grasp on how the D&D rules work differently from a bunch of the different modern RPGs. There are a few FAQs/guides on the Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition Gamefaqs page you could read if you want some general tips on different kinds of characters you could do, though you would need to avoid the sections with any spoilers outside of building your own character. Spoilers that a manual might give you about story, locations, or different stuff like that I don't think would be in the guides I'll link you to though. There's an FAQ/Walkthrough which I think would be too difficult to avoid potential spoilers on the Gamefaqs page, but there is a party creation guide where you can learn some different things about building your own character if you only stick to reading that section.

    Here's one such party creation guide on Gamefaqs you could look at for information on building your character. Just as a spoiler alert, avoid reading anything on the joinable NPCs and stuff if you don't want to be spoiled for anything. I also wouldn't read any of the spell sections either. Just read the stuff for races and classes you can do for your character, and you'll glean a lot of info from that which can help you out.

    http://www.gamefaqs.com/pc/663933-baldurs-gate-enhanced-edition/faqs/65403

    Now if all you want to read up on is just the Dungeons & Dragons type stuff with the rules and different aspects of those kinds of games, then skip reading that party creation FAQ entirely if you want to go into the game completely blind outside of understanding the game's rules. This FAQ will go ahead and fill you in on all the Dungeons & Dragons type of rules you'd need to be familiar with so you can play the game and understand stuff better.

    http://www.gamefaqs.com/pc/75251-baldurs-gate/faqs/8566

    Hope that this post helps you out.

    MithraJuliusBorisov
  • GrumGrum Member, Mobile Tester Posts: 2,100
    Just, for the love of all that is holy, don't read the baldurs gate "books"

    typo_tillySertoriusDreadKhanJuliusBorisov
  • KidCarnivalKidCarnival Member Posts: 3,747
    Watch this and maybe the 2 other parts (UI and Tips & Tricks):



    There are minimal spoilers (you only see maps and NPCs you'd run into on the second map, after the "tutorial map" of Candlekeep. It explains the basics of important things and lets you figure out what works best with that knowledge.

    In total, that's maybe an hour (if you don't skip parts you don't need). Less than reading the manuals or guides, more efficient.

    MithraJuliusBorisov
  • Son_of_ImoenSon_of_Imoen Member Posts: 1,779
    The manual explains the mechanics of the game, you don't need to be afraid to get story spoilers by reading the manual, as it won't.

    MusignyelminsterJuliusBorisov
  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    Hmmm, so this way looks good:

    Don't read anything about universe before at least playing first time (after finishing first time I will read more universe manuals and books -not game books- etc.) but try to read some mechanic guides.

    Thanks @KidCarnival , I am downloading videos right now and I will watch them after reading the manuals that @thelovebat gave.

    I have a question though, I am reading D&D manual right now but it say
    "AC = Armor Class, roughly how difficult a figure is to hit. AC starts
    with a base score of 10 and is improved by lowering the number.
    Therefore a 0 AC is better than a 10, and a -10 is better still."

    and this doesn't make sense, how is it getting lower makes it harder to hit? Shouldn't that be opposite? And this:

    " A successful hit is decided when the random roll is greater than the
    attacker's THAC0 - enemy AC. If a 15 THAC0 Fighter attacks a 0 AC
    goblin then you must roll 15 or greater. (The game itself usually does the
    rolling for you, but it still follows these mechanics) Remember that a roll
    of 20 will always hit. So, even if the goblin's AC was -400, if you roll a
    20 you will still hit it. If the goblin has 10 AC then you need only roll a
    5 or better, etc. (THAC0 - EnemyAC = 15 - 10 = 5)"

    So the hitting based on THAC0 - EnemeyAC but if the enemy has -400 you need 415 assuming you have 15 THAC0, how can you still hit with getting 20 at dice? And by the way lets say you have 15 THAC0 and EnemyAC is 10 so you need 5 to hit right? How the damage calculated? I mean if you get 5 or 6 or higher number what is the difference?

    JuliusBorisov
  • NeverusedNeverused Member Posts: 782
    Mithra said:


    So the hitting based on THAC0 - EnemeyAC but if the enemy has -400 you need 415 assuming you have 15 THAC0, how can you still hit with getting 20 at dice? And by the way lets say you have 15 THAC0 and EnemyAC is 10 so you need 5 to hit right? How the damage calculated? I mean if you get 5 or 6 or higher number what is the difference?

    20s are counted as automatic hits, as D&D rules stated that even a lowly peasant should have at least a CHANCE of hitting a heavily armored beast, no matter if it's only a 5% chance. Acs rarely drop lower than -20, if even that, and THAC0 can be around -8 or so at that stage of the game if I recall correctly.

    Damage is its own roll entirely, and it doesn't matter how much you beat the opposing AC by. Lower THAC0 is still better just because that means you get to roll your damage more often, statistically. Damage is generally the weapon damage roll, like 1d6 for a shortsword or 1d8 for a longsword, plus strength bonuses + proficiency bonuses if you're a Warrior class, + enchantment bonuses for magical weapons.

    Hope this helped!

  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    Kinda but you said that even a lowly peasant should have a chance but if shouldn't lowly peasant have like 16-17 THAC0 maybe? Then if AC is lower than -4 it should be mathematicaly impossible to hit or as I understand actually we think like 20 is a special side of the dice and it doesn't count as any number it is just a face that means "definetly hit". So even though you need 1000 (just guessing :P) at your dice (I don't know maybe you are a peasant fighting against a god xD) if you have 20 at your dice you still get a hit.

    One more thing though lets say you get a hit, how do you calculate the damage? Is there any difference between getting 16 or 18 at your dice ( assuming you need 10 for hitting)?

  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    One more thing that I want to ask, since this D&D rules and Baldur's Gate rules for the making the game more realistic and more true to fantastic lore, why in the guide it says
    "Half-Elf !rac,halfe-

    Overall Rating: 1/4
    Available Classes: All single classes except Paladin, Monk, and the following
    Specialist Mages: Abjurer, Illusionist, Invoker, and Necromancer.
    Multi-Class Combinations: All except Cleric/Thief.
    Special: 30% resistance against charm/sleep effects and infravision.

    The only reason to be a half-elf is to be a Bard or if you really, really want
    to be certain multi-class combinations (especially the triple-class options).
    Infravision is pointless otherwise, and enemy sleep effects are so rare as to
    be pointless. Half-elves do get better pick-pocket though than humans."

    Shouldn't the half-elves gets the strength of humans and intelligence etc. of elves? Seems like they should be much more stronger than humans to me? (Well I never read Forgotten Realms books but in Dragonlance it was like that and as I know Dragonlance series were also based on D&D mechanics -books- ).

  • deltagodeltago Member Posts: 7,481
    You nailed ot with the multiclass comment. Half-elves have the most class combinations open to them.

    Damage is a second calculated die roll. You roll once to hit. If that roll succeeds, the game will roll for damage. What you roll doesnt add to the damage unless you roll a critical hit (natural 20 and with some prof 19) where damage is doubled. There is always a 5% chance to hit an opponent or completely miss an opponent regardless of THAC0 and AC.

    MithraJuliusBorisov
  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    edited June 2015
    Ok thanks for clearing those up ^^
    However, why that manual " http://www.gamefaqs.com/pc/663933-baldurs-gate-enhanced-edition/faqs/65403 "
    says that half-elves are that worst class (it makes kind of scoring the races and only race I saw that got 1/4 is half-elves)? I don't know what to expect but seems like Fighter/Sorcerer seems like a good combination though leveling up slowly will be bad I guess but Half-Elves wouldn't be better choice at this combination than humans?

    And one more thing what is "kit"? They use this word a lot in guides but never explain.

  • thelovebatthelovebat Member Posts: 218
    edited June 2015
    The person in that section was only scoring half elves based on the rules and play of Baldur's Gate individually. The Guide author I think wouldn't have anything personally against half elves or how they are in different parts of lore, only that in this game there are just a few certain reasons why you'd be them over another race/class combination (for experienced players). If you plan on having roleplaying aspects for your character, you can disregard the individual ratings given and just read the general comments about the race or class, or simply skip reading the rest on building a character if roleplay aspects are important to you. Maybe if you try one character and don't like it that much, you could go back to reading bits of that to find a race and class combination that more suits what you may want. But yes fighter/mage starts off a bit slow (regular mages also start off slow too), however it only takes gaining a level or two before your character would be much better and more fun. :) And you'll be able to find NPCs to join your party as the game goes along.

    Kits are something introduced in the Enhanced Edition of Baldur's Gate, and essentially it adds more variety to the different classes you can play, with different unique advantages, restrictions, and penalties over the base classes which would normally be available to you. To my knowledge, things like kits were introduced in 3rd Edition Dungeons & Dragons, but the original Baldur's Gate was made when 2nd Edition was still the thing. Basically if you want a more specialized sort of character, a kit might just be the thing for you. If you plan on doing a 'dual class' with a human race character, then using something like a kit is the preferred method of starting your character, since a second class with 'dual classing' may help to cover up for the disadvantages or double up with the nice things about the previous class.

    The Dungeons & Dragons ruleset FAQ can tell you more about the differences between Dual Classing with humans and Multi Classing with the other races. Just as a note, you can't multi class as a kit in Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition, and only the Gnome race gets to Multi Class as anything other than base classes (they default as mages to Illusionists when being a mage). An Illusionist for example is called a specialist mage, and essentially what happens with them is they get one extra spell for each spell level in their spellbook when it becomes available (so for example if you normally would have Two spell slots available for 2nd level spells, with an Illusionist you'd get an extra third slot for 2nd level spells). The downside to this great advantage is that you'll be restricted from learning any spells of the opposite spell school. So technically you won't be able to learn all of the spells, but you'll be able to cast more spells in a day and this is useful for higher levels of spells with getting additional castings as a free extra basically. There are a number of different spell schools so losing access to just one of them wouldn't be bad since you're only going to need to know a certain amount of them anyway. Just don't be an Enchanter specialist mage as you lose access to a spell school full of fan favorite spells that would make things easier for a new player and are useful as well.

    Post edited by thelovebat on
    Mithra
  • BelgarathMTHBelgarathMTH Member Posts: 5,600
    @Mithra , I didn't see a clear answer to your question about the d20 to hit system.

    A roll of 20 is called a "critical hit", and a roll of 1 is called a "critical miss". A critical hit always hits, and a critical miss always misses. So, you are right that both 1 and 20 are exceptional rolls that bypass all the mathematical figuring that goes into rolls of 2 to 19.

    Critical hits against characters who are not wearing helments do double damage. So, helmets are very important for any characters who fight in melee. Characters who can't wear helments should probably be avoiding melee unless absolutely forced to it.

    Did you catch that "Thac0" means "The roll to hit armor class zero"? I've seen a lot of convoluted attempts at explaining AC and Thac0 that forget to mention that one simple piece of information that makes the whole thing make sense.

    A Thac0 of 10 means you need a 10 to hit AC0, a 9 to hit AC1, an 8 to hit AC2, etc. You will automatically hit AC10 every single time, unless you roll a critical miss (1).

    A Thac0 of 11 means you need an 11 to hit AC0, a 10 to hit AC1, etc.

    You can make a table out of this, and in fact, the cardboard dungeon master's screens for tabletop usually have the table for the DM to make a quick reference. The computer program for the game does the same thing.

    MithrathelovebatTuthJuliusBorisov
  • thelovebatthelovebat Member Posts: 218
    edited June 2015

    The person in that section was only scoring half elves based on the rules and play of Baldur's Gate individually. The Guide author I think wouldn't have anything personally against half elves or how they are in different parts of lore, only that in this game there are just a few certain reasons why you'd be them over another race/class combination (for experienced players). If you plan on having roleplaying aspects for your character, you can disregard the individual ratings given and just read the general comments about the race or class, or simply skip reading the rest on building a character if roleplay aspects are important to you. Maybe if you try one character and don't like it that much, you could go back to reading bits of that to find a race and class combination that more suits what you may want. But yes fighter/mage starts off a bit slow (regular mages also start off slow too), however it only takes gaining a level or two before your character would be much better and more fun. :) And you'll be able to find NPCs to join your party as the game goes along.

    Kits are something introduced in the Enhanced Edition of Baldur's Gate, and essentially it adds more variety to the different classes you can play, with different unique advantages, restrictions, and penalties over the base classes which would normally be available to you. To my knowledge, things like kits were introduced in 3rd Edition Dungeons & Dragons, but the original Baldur's Gate was made when 2nd Edition was still the thing. Basically if you want a more specialized sort of character, a kit might just be the thing for you. If you plan on doing a 'dual class' with a human race character, then using something like a kit is the preferred method of starting your character, since a second class with 'dual classing' may help to cover up for the disadvantages or double up with the nice things about the previous class.

    The Dungeons & Dragons ruleset FAQ can tell you more about the differences between Dual Classing with humans and Multi Classing with the other races. Just as a note, you can't multi class as a kit in Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition, and only the Gnome race gets to Multi Class as anything other than base classes (they default as mages to Illusionists when being a mage). An Illusionist for example is called a specialist mage, and essentially what happens with them is they get one extra spell for each spell level in their spellbook when it becomes available (so for example if you normally would have Two spell slots available for 2nd level spells, with an Illusionist you'd get an extra third slot for 2nd level spells). The downside to this great advantage is that you'll be restricted from learning any spells of the opposite spell school. So technically you won't be able to learn all of the spells, but you'll be able to cast more spells in a day and this is useful for higher levels of spells with getting additional castings as a free extra basically. There are a number of different spell schools so losing access to just one of them wouldn't be bad since you're only going to need to know a certain amount of them anyway. Just don't be an Enchanter specialist mage as you lose access to a spell school full of fan favorite spells that would make things easier for a new player and are useful as well.

    Just giving a correction to my previous post, I accidentally said you can't dual class as a kit. I meant to say that you're not allowed to multi class as a kit (outside of Gnomes being able to multi class as Illusionists), and that you can't start off as one class then dual class into a kit. You can only dual class with a kit if you start your character with a kit then dual class into something else.

  • KidCarnivalKidCarnival Member Posts: 3,747
    What hasn't been mentioned about dual classing is that you can only dual into a different archetype class.

    So, if you are a Fighter, you can't dual class into a different fighter-type. You can become a thief or cleric or mage, but not a Fighter/Ranger.

    You can start out as a kitted Fighter, i.e. Berzerker, and then dual class into a cleric, making you a Berzerker/Cleric.

    You can not start as a Cleric and dual into a kitted Fighter, so there is no (legal) way to become a Cleric/Berzerker.

    Basically, you can only take a kit when creating a character and dual into a generalist of another type.

  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    Ok one more thing that comes to my mind, so as I understand as you leveled (experience level) your stats don't get higher. Is there any way to increase your stats? I mean lets say I started with 15 str, any quests or events or action etc. to increase it? I mean is there anychance that when I finished the game I will have maxed all my stats?

  • doggydoggy Member Posts: 313
    edited June 2015
    There are ways in game. But you will have to find out yourself.

    That said you will not be able to max out your stats so make sure to spend time rolling that perfect character. It's time well spend.

    Mithra
  • GallowglassGallowglass Member Posts: 3,356
    Mithra said:

    Is there any way to increase your stats? I mean lets say I started with 15 str, any quests or events or action etc. to increase it? I mean is there anychance that when I finished the game I will have maxed all my stats?

    I don't think it's much of a spoiler to put numbers to this ... so, over the course of BG1ee, there are opportunities (if you find where they all are!) to increase each of your stats permanently by 1 point, or 3 points in the case of Wisdom. And that's all ... so no, you won't finish with maxed stats.

    However, there are also a few items in the game which improve certain stats (so long as you keep that item equipped), and there are numerous spells and potions which improve various stats for a limited duration.

    Mithra
  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    Well I just started and get a good roll after a loooooong rerolling.
    103 ^^
    I opened a elven archer,
    18/04 STR
    19 DEX
    17 CONS
    16 INT
    15 WIS
    18 CHAR

    Though I think I made a mistake. You know at the beginning of the game there is a mage and some kind of funny guy gave you health poiton and ask you to escort them to some mines I rejected them since with the thief and two guys from inn that will join me and them, party gonna be six person and i kind of hesitated and rejected them now I am thinking that I don't have a mage. Shoud I accepted their quest or can I find them and accept the quest or will I find new and more powerfull mage follower and no need to find those two?

  • GallowglassGallowglass Member Posts: 3,356
    The pair whom you rejected (Xzar and Montaron) are both Evil. If you're playing an Evil character, then they could have been a valuable asset. If you're playing a Good character, then you probably wouldn't have wanted to keep those two for very long anyway, so they're not much of a loss.

    Even when I'm playing a Good character, I usually let those two join the party temporarily, until I find some more suitable recruits.

    Nevertheless, there are plenty of other companions available to you, including several whom you will meet fairly early, so don't worry about missing those two.

    Yes, it's very useful to have a Mage (or two!) in your party, but Mages are rather weak for the first few levels, so you're not missing out on too much by not having one immediately. There's another Mage whom you'll very likely meet in Chapter One, and also a Bard (who can also cast spells like a Mage once he reaches level 2), both of whom are Neutral (and thereby can work with any alignment). Then there's another Mage (another Evil one) whom you'll meet early in Chapter Two, and two more Mages (a Good one and another Neutral one) whom you can find before the end of Chapter Two.

    Mithra
  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    Ok one more thing, I got this neutral or good mage (half-elf wild mage girl) at chapter 1 and I don't her to attack with melee weapon at combats and try to manage that at her scripts but couldn't do it. Whatever I choose she still attacks with her staff. For the god sake she has only 4 hp and she still attacks with staff xD and one more thing that I am looking at the map and traveling the south right now but the thing I am curious is that if all game is in Sword Coast it is a pretty small area (seems like to me comparing to other RPGs that I have played) or is it going to be increase in the future? It feels like if this is the whole map I can finish the game in a couple hours O.o

  • BlucherBlucher Member Posts: 110
    As a Greyhawk fan with (at the time) an active loathing of the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, I have to say that the BG games gave me some appreciation for the world. Although Oerth still maintains the preeminent place in my heart, I do actually rather like the FR now.

    I'd say if you know nothing of the world, then wait to read up on it until after you've played the games. The games have a lot of Forgotten Realms-nerd fan-service in them, that you might appreciate more by playing first and then reading.

    MusignyMithra
  • GallowglassGallowglass Member Posts: 3,356
    Mithra said:

    Ok one more thing, I got this neutral or good mage (half-elf wild mage girl) at chapter 1

    Ah, Neera. Yes, that's the one to whom I was referring.
    Mithra said:

    ... and I don't her to attack with melee weapon at combats and try to manage that at her scripts but couldn't do it. Whatever I choose she still attacks with her staff. For the god sake she has only 4 hp and she still attacks with staff

    So equip her with a sling and bullets in her other weapon slot, and have the sling selected instead of the staff. Then also check what script she's using in the Customisation screen (which is an option on the Record screen), and if necessary change her script (or set her to None). Or turn off the AI and manage the characters yourself (which I recommend, I always do it that way myself ... but some people prefer to have the game work more automatically).

    In the I.T. helpdesk support business, we have a favourite saying, which we frequently mutter under our breath but only occasionally say out loud to users: READ THE ****ING MANUAL! (It's usually abbreviated to just RTFM, because we mutter it so often.) I strongly recommend that you read the manual, to learn how to control your party effectively. It doesn't contain spoilers for the story.
    Mithra said:

    ... and one more thing that I am looking at the map and traveling the south right now but the thing I am curious is that if all game is in Sword Coast it is a pretty small area (seems like to me comparing to other RPGs that I have played) or is it going to be increase in the future? It feels like if this is the whole map I can finish the game in a couple hours O.o

    Well, obviously I don't know with what other games you're comparing this. However, lots more locations appear on the map as they become accessible to you, I'd say it's a pretty big area when you can see it all. Total playing time from start to completion will obviously vary considerably, depending upon your playing-style and experience, but it's certainly a great deal more than "a couple hours". Perhaps a hundred times more than that.

    Mithra
  • MithraMithra Member Posts: 9
    I read two manuels that given at top of this topic (D&D and Race/Class) also I watched the videos that given at top of this topic, UI and Character Creation. I know that I should open the Character page and Customoziation then Scripts and pick a script. However lets' say there is a script that says "Passive" or "Mage Passive" which suggests in their context that if I choose them that char will not attack unless its attacked by an enemy then it will first try to use ranged weapon if that is not exist then use melee weapon.

    But, even though I click Neera away from combat after a sec she sturts running again with her quarterstaff to enemies. I didn't know that I can disable the AI which I will thanks for that ^^.

    About the other games, e.g. The Witcher series, or WoW (I know this is unfair :P), or Elder Scroll series, or Mass Effect series, or Dragon Age Origins, or Diablo (not exactly RPG I know), Titan's Quest, Torchlight etc. All of them had a really huge world but when I play BG:EE ( I am still going to mines at south I haven't reach there yet.) it felt like much more smaller. I don't know it just felt like that.

  • thelovebatthelovebat Member Posts: 218
    edited June 2015
    Mithra said:

    I read two manuels that given at top of this topic (D&D and Race/Class) also I watched the videos that given at top of this topic, UI and Character Creation. I know that I should open the Character page and Customoziation then Scripts and pick a script. However lets' say there is a script that says "Passive" or "Mage Passive" which suggests in their context that if I choose them that char will not attack unless its attacked by an enemy then it will first try to use ranged weapon if that is not exist then use melee weapon.

    But, even though I click Neera away from combat after a sec she sturts running again with her quarterstaff to enemies. I didn't know that I can disable the AI which I will thanks for that ^^.

    About the other games, e.g. The Witcher series, or WoW (I know this is unfair :P), or Elder Scroll series, or Mass Effect series, or Dragon Age Origins, or Diablo (not exactly RPG I know), Titan's Quest, Torchlight etc. All of them had a really huge world but when I play BG:EE ( I am still going to mines at south I haven't reach there yet.) it felt like much more smaller. I don't know it just felt like that.

    Equip Neera with a sling in one of her weapon slots, and buy bullets (that's just what they're called, there are no guns in the game whatsoever) for ammunition. Buy around 16 portions of bullets for Neera and any other NPC who may be able to use a basic ranged weapon like slings. After buying a sling and a lot of bullets from the store in Beregost, put the sling in Neera's 2nd weapon slot next to her staff. Then, fill up her quiver slots above that with bullet ammunition for the sling (should be able to fill each quiver slot with up to 80 bullets, and there are 3 quiver slots total). Now when you have Neera equipped with a sling, she won't keep trying to run into the fight with her staff, but you need to make sure she always has ammunition for her sling so she doesn't go back to equipping her staff by default.

    One quick note. Having a spellcaster like Neera use an auto-attack script with her equipped weapon doesn't stop or interrupt her from casting spells, so you won't have to worry about her trying to attack in the middle of casting a spell. The only thing it interrupts to my knowledge is trying to use turn undead with a Paladin or a Cleric, but as a new player I don't think you'll be doing any of that at all (I've gotten along great without ever utilizing it). If you want to turn undead with that kind of NPC, then turn the script off for that character when the time comes, but for Neera and other mages you have nothing to worry about. It's probably better for a good deal of the early and mid game to have her with an auto attack script so she's at least attacking automatically with her sling and switching onto new targets when an enemy dies. When she has a far bigger selection of spells later in the game you may not need this, but as a ranged attacker she can still be useful for trying to interrupt the enemy's spells they cast. There should be a +1 magical sling in Beregost you can buy, I'd get that for Neera right away and after she gains a few levels use a proficiency point for her in slings.

    Her 17 of Dexterity is already pretty good for using slings, giving her around a +3 attack bonus, so definitely have her using slings for a while. There will be a hefty penalty cus her only proficiency point is in staffs right now, but later when you get her skilled in slings then she'll be a decent ranged attacker with a sling.

  • KidCarnivalKidCarnival Member Posts: 3,747
    Set low level mages, bards and other characters you want to use ranged weapons to an archer/ranged script that says nothing about casting. You don't want Neera to waste her only offensive spell on a kobold anyway. Cast manually (turn AI off during tougher fights) and otherwise just let the script treat them as ranged fighters.

    Just because a script has a different class in the name doesn't mean you can't use it. You can put a cleric script on a mage or a fighter script on a druid and what not. The characters will only use the parts that apply. If they have no healing spells, they won't try to heal allies if you give them a paladin script, but they will do all the things listed in the script that apply (i.e. choice of weapons, use of potions, melee/ranged).

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