Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Categories

Axis & Allies 1942 Online is now available in Early Access! Buy it on Steam. The FAQ is available.
New Premium Module: Tyrants of the Moonsea! Read More
Attention, new and old users! Please read the new rules of conduct for the forums, and we hope you enjoy your stay!

Do we get Steam Keys?

13»

Comments

  • RnRClownRnRClown Member Posts: 182
    I have yet to purchase BG:EE as I was awaiting a few patches to roll out and to see if a potential Steam release would come to pass. Both of these criteria have now been met. My concern now is when (or if) BG2:EE is released will that also make its way to Steam? It is common knowledge that Atari (the publisher) and not Overhaul (the developer) put BG:EE on Steam. It's also been well documented recently that Atari are having a little financial trouble, plainly speaking; bankruptcy.

    If Atari go out of business, can Beamdog (and Steam) still list and sell BG:EE?

    If Atari go out of business, what would that mean for a potential release of BG2:EE? Furthermore, would the lack of a publisher a) create a stumbling block for the release of a BG2:EE, and b) see the potential sequel remain a Beamdog exclusive?

    I didn't really want to create another thread, thus my posting within this virtual space.

  • DeeDee Member Posts: 10,447
    If Atari goes fully out of business (which really isn't all that likely), then they will sell most of their assets, which would include the Baldur's Gate license. Beamdog would still be able to distribute the game under its previous contract, at least until a new one is signed.

    But honestly, that scenario isn't very probable. Atari filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which isn't the same as going out of business.

    As for BG2 and Steam, it does seem likely that it would make its way to Steam eventually (just like, again, we said was a possibility for BG1). But, again, the time-frame involved isn't easily predictable or reliable.

  • bigdogchrisbigdogchris Member Posts: 1,336
    I wonder if WoTC easier to work with for D&D rights, than Atari is with BG rights....

  • mlnevesemlnevese Member, Moderator Posts: 9,474
    And I wonder what Overhaul could do if it owned BG rights...

  • DeeDee Member Posts: 10,447
  • RnRClownRnRClown Member Posts: 182
    It would be good, in my humble opinion, if Overhaul could obtain the remaining rights to the Baldur's Gate franchise. Many may disagree, but the folks at Overhaul were part of the original Bioware team. They have also done a good turn for many Baldur's Gate fans with this Enhanced Edition. The ultimate ease of use with improvements that are experience enhancing.

    Ray Muzyka and Greg Zeschuk have retired from the games industry and moved on to pastures new. Thus, Overhaul are the best move going. The rights would be better in their hands, than it is in the hands of Atari. It would be better in their hands than it would be the hands of EA who seem to hoard everything under the sun.

    Anyway, I steered this a tad off-topic. Apologies.

    The itch to own BG:EE is becoming a difficult one to avoid scratching. I would like to purchase from Beamdog because Overhaul put in the work, and they would no doubt receive a larger cut of the fee via this avenue. I would like to purchase from Steam because unless it's a physical boxed copy, every digital game I own has been purchased through Steam. I like the security of knowing Valve should never go under, meaning my digital games library is eternal as long as it is within the world of Steam. It's the social aspect, too, friends lists and achievements, etc.

    The subject of this thread is Steam Keys. If it comes to pass that Steam Keys are provided for every purchase of BG:EE from Beamdog, how does this affeact Beamdog/Overhaul financially? I've never understood the process. I see it with other games, such as FTL; where when bought direct from the developer you also receive a redeemable Steam Key. Does the developer have to pay for this? Do Valve actually profit from providing these keys? Or are they content enough that when the game is activated on Steam the customer has to install their client (if they haven't already) and may then see another game they desire at a price they can't refuse, thus providing business. I only ventured over to Steam because of that process. I had Portal 2 for the PS3. I saw that I could activate it on Steam to own on my PC for no extra cost. As a direct result of that I finally installed Steam and have since purchased many more titles via their store. All because of a redeemable Steam Key.

  • bigdogchrisbigdogchris Member Posts: 1,336
    Does the Steam version have the launcher as well, or are all updates delivered through Steam?

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.

    Necdilzor
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.

  • DeeDee Member Posts: 10,447

    Does the Steam version have the launcher as well, or are all updates delivered through Steam?

    All of the updates are delivered through Steam. Launching the game runs it just as if you had opened up baldur.exe.

    Which is definitely a perk of the Steam client, although you have to wait for the patch to be released.

  • RnRClownRnRClown Member Posts: 182
    I've been reading a few of the other threads circling this subject of the Steam release and a potential negotiation of Steam keys. My overriding emotion after that fact is empathy for Overhaul. They had a right to exclusively distribute the game initially, via their Beamdog client, to maximise early profits before brokering a deal with Valve for the game to be distributed via Steam when the time was right. I assume that would have happened. It's difficult to say, but hypothetically speaking, Overhaul would probably have negotiated for the inclusion of Steam keys during that deal. Valve appear to have a good track record for giving redeemable keys to developers (at what cost, if any, I do not know). Atari as a publisher would not care about this and probably did not give it a moments thought. Overhaul are now attempting to salvage the mess Atari created when they are in no way obliged to. They would be well within their rights to pass the buck to Atari on this matter, and say no more on the subject.

    It's a tricky situation this digital distribution business. Valve have a stranglehold on the digital market with Steam. That is both a positive and a negative. It's a positive for customers because it is a great client that provides a fantastic service. It is secure. It has the ultimate ease of use. It is dependable. Nevertheless, it is a negative for developers if they attempt to distribute a game outside of Steam. It alienates a large majority of customers who buy via Steam or not at all. It also leads to a backlash from customers who purchased the game elsewhere when they see it appear on Steam and do no receive the redeemable key they feel they are entitled to. Whether that feeling of entitlement is right or wrong, it is a valid argument because other developers regularly offer a redeemable key with both a physical purchase, or a digital purchase. For example, I purchased a physical copy of Borderlands 2 and received a redeemable Steam key. That's great. I now play Borderlands 2 via Steam.

    Anyway. It's not difficult to see why publishers are so unpopular and why they are going to become obsolete in time. One game I am enjoying at the moment is a title called Miasmata. If I'm not wrong it went straight from the developer (IonFX) to the distributor (Steam). That's hopefully the future. Publishers, be gone.

    Sinai
  • PreyerPreyer Member Posts: 16
    Aosaw said:


    All of the updates are delivered through Steam. Launching the game runs it just as if you had opened up baldur.exe.

    Which is definitely a perk of the Steam client, although you have to wait for the patch to be released.

    Also a drawback by the way, as some mods are broken by updating the games (e.g. all of the Paradox Interactive strategy games). There is a "don't update my games automatically" option, but I've understood its a little buggy and doesn't always work.

  • ParaneParane Member Posts: 14
    If I knew it would come to Steam I'd probaly have waited a little longer for it. I don't like having games on several different platforms and prefer to have most of my games under the Steam umbrella.

  • RnRClownRnRClown Member Posts: 182
    I also prefer to have all of my digital games within one client and from one distributor. It is easier to keep tabs on and to navigate. Having said that, I purchased BG:EE from Beamdog (for a few reasons) and found the transaction process to be swift and efficient, the client to be light and intuitive, and the digital rights management to be very unintrusive. The latter may be entirely non-existent outside of the initial purchase and download.

    I neither log into Beamdog nor run their client to launch Baldur's Gate. I simply created a shortcut to the game executable and double-click that to launch the game. It is quick. It is simple. I like it.

    Beamdog is actually a pleasant alternative to Steam. It does not replace Steam. I doubt anything ever shall. But it presents another outlet for a little competition along with a simpler gaming experience (no need to run the client or ensure a stable internet connection that is always up and running).

    Necdilzor
  • SwiftCrackSwiftCrack Member Posts: 8
    The game is 50% off in the Steam store today as well...

Sign In or Register to comment.