Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Categories

Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition has been released! Visit nwn.beamdog.com to make an order. NWN:EE FAQ is available.
Soundtracks for BG:EE, SoD, BG2:EE, IWD:EE, PST:EE are now available in the Beamdog store.
Attention, new and old users! Please read the new rules of conduct for the forums, and we hope you enjoy your stay!

Why Early Swords Don't Have Hilts *Very Insightful Video*

WithinAmnesiaWithinAmnesia Member Posts: 757

Friends, what do you personally think of this video?

semiticgodSethDavistypo_tillyDiscoCat

Comments

  • bob_vengbob_veng Member Posts: 1,962
    personally?

    treat-iss, not treat-eyes

    WithinAmnesia
  • DreadKhanDreadKhan Member Posts: 3,514
    Interesting he noted knuckle guards showing up earlier for slashing swords, ie falchions. Falchions tend to be used differently, ie chops and slashes, meaning a standard guard offers less effective protection. They were also balanced differently, making defensive use more difficult, and even a marginal disadvantage could result in injury between pretty even combatants.

    No mention of the added utility of just plain old pummeling with a steel guard vs relying on the pommel. Civilians with less training/experience tend to fight differently than a trained veteran soldier, and if killing is not wise, punching with a guard will do quite a bit of damage.

    Its also interesting that not all cultures use the same types of guards for their swords, and some use little or no guard. Guardless swords weren't usually that big, and but I'd wager you'd have much better balance for slashing if you have less hilt-weight. Same principle a battle axe relied on actually, so lighter guards might be prefered in a case where you want a lighter sword that strikes disproportionately hard. Katana are an example of this I would argue, and its not a coincidence that traditionally you wield one with both hands to offset the balance of lacking a large guard or pommel.

    When I make machettes for personal use (usually from random good steel scrap), I rarely use much counterweight, as they cut MUCH better with no balance. My most aggressive chopper, a massive two-handed beast can cut incredibly deep from weight/balance alone. I can cut down a pretty big tree in surprisingly little time with it, or section a big log. The only balance I have on it is a wire wrap to absorb shock.

    Vs an unarmoured opponent (ie not even boiled leather) you wouldn't really need extra cutting power either, so the cost of less damage for much better defence becomes an obvious trade off.

    lunarWithinAmnesia
  • lunarlunar Member Posts: 3,325
    Whenever I watch a video about a guy talking while casually waving around a real sword, I anxiously expect him to cut or decapitate himself at any moment so I can not concentrate on what he is talking, sorry. :smiley:

    WithinAmnesiatypo_tilly
  • DreadKhanDreadKhan Member Posts: 3,514
    lunar said:

    Whenever I watch a video about a guy talking while casually waving around a real sword, I anxiously expect him to cut or decapitate himself at any moment so I can not concentrate on what he is talking, sorry. :smiley:

    Yeah, there are times to not swing sharp blades around. I might like screwing around with a sword while drinking, but must say its a bad idea to swing a blade while answering the call of nature.

  • NonnahswriterNonnahswriter Member Posts: 2,400

    You should swing around a morningstar instead. Much safer.

    Or better yet, a flail. :smiley:

    DreadKhanWithinAmnesiaJuliusBorisov
  • bob_vengbob_veng Member Posts: 1,962
    lol not
    at most i'd stick with a stick

    JuliusBorisov
  • DreadKhanDreadKhan Member Posts: 3,514
    ...You know an alternate name for a morningstar is a 'Holy Water Sprinkler', right?

    All told, dangerous toys are fun, but you could get hurt!

    bob_vengWithinAmnesiaJuliusBorisov
Sign In or Register to comment.