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Secrets..

NatenNaten Member Posts: 138
Everyone has them.. But if you tell someone then it is no longer a secret. But if you keep them inside they will slowly eat your liver and then eventually give you the Herpies (or was it Harpies) either way its bad to keep these things in too long! But help is here, share some secrets, stuff no one knows about you preferably (it's not cool telling other peoples secrets).

I will get the ball rolling I guess. When I was young (like ten or so) I would ... steal Dungeon & Dragon Books from the book store. Terrible I know.. I am a monster. I have never stole anything since those days believe it or not, and every time I see those books I feel deep shame. In fact I must hide them away in a box of books so that I do not get reminded of my foolishness, but I cannot just throw them away or even give them away because I still like having them.

Hmm I guess that wasn't really a very juicy secret. How about I will share a better one if more people share some of theres.

TeflonJuliusBorisov
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Comments

  • O_BruceO_Bruce Member Posts: 2,785
    edited April 2015
    The thing about my secrets is... They are secrets!

    NonnahswriterTeflonJuliusBorisov
  • simplessimples Member Posts: 540
    edited April 2015
    I found some guy's wallet in El Segundo once

  • NatenNaten Member Posts: 138
    Oh you guys are no fun..

  • simplessimples Member Posts: 540
    Ok. I cheated once. It wasn't technically cheating but we took "a break" (he left me) and I had a fling. He saw it as cheating.. I don't really, but that was three years ago and we're still going strong so that counts for something I suppose

    NatenDJKajuru
  • NimranNimran Member Posts: 4,848
    Maybe you should hire a secretary. :cookie:

    Naten
  • enqenqenqenq Member Posts: 497
    edited April 2015
    What is too much for one, enough for two but not enough for three?

    A tandem bike.

    NatenFiendish_Warrior
  • joluvjoluv Member Posts: 2,136
    Is that store still in business? If so, go there and tell the cashier that you stole some books there when you were a kid and that even though you know it doesn't make it okay, it's been eating at you and you'd like to pay for them. The cashier will be confused and possibly mad, it'll be awkward as hell, and they might not even accept your money, but you'll feel better for taking responsibility. And it's not like you can get in trouble; misdemeanor shoplifting has a short statute of limitations. If the store isn't there anymore, give the money to an appropriate charity and then let yourself off the hook. You don't need to have shame hanging over you for something that is so easy to make amends for.

    NatenJuliusBorisovCrevsDaak
  • Fiendish_WarriorFiendish_Warrior Member Posts: 309
    :lol:@joluv For a moment, I thought you were responding to my story. Imagine the confusion (and temptation) when I read your recommendation to express remorse to the cashier at a pizza joint for stealing books from there as a child. I'd love to see their reaction.

    NatenJuliusBorisovmeaglothCrevsDaak
  • joluvjoluv Member Posts: 2,136
    @Fiendish_Warrior: Ha! No, I think you're totally in the clear already.

    JuliusBorisov
  • TressetTresset Member, Moderator Posts: 8,154
    I do not consider myself a human.

    Naten
  • TressetTresset Member, Moderator Posts: 8,154
    @joluv No... I suppose in a physical sense I am a human, but in a mental sense I sometimes believe I am something else. Perhaps an uncommon sub species of human, I don't know...

    Natenjoluv
  • NatenNaten Member Posts: 138
    edited April 2015
    joluv said:

    Is that store still in business? If so, go there and tell the cashier that you stole some books there when you were a kid and that even though you know it doesn't make it okay, it's been eating at you and you'd like to pay for them. The cashier will be confused and possibly mad, it'll be awkward as hell, and they might not even accept your money, but you'll feel better for taking responsibility. And it's not like you can get in trouble; misdemeanor shoplifting has a short statute of limitations. If the store isn't there anymore, give the money to an appropriate charity and then let yourself off the hook. You don't need to have shame hanging over you for something that is so easy to make amends for.

    I like this idea, although I still buy books from the store all the time so admitting to once stealing from them would make future purchases extremely ... awkward. I will likely go for the giving money to a good charity idea instead, children's hospital could probably make better use of the money than a Massive book store franchise anyways (still feel bad for cheating the writers and artists of the books though). Thanks for the interesting idea.
    Tresset said:

    @joluv No... I suppose in a physical sense I am a human, but in a mental sense I sometimes believe I am something else. Perhaps an uncommon sub species of human, I don't know...

    Any thing specific to make you feel this way?? Very curious.

    joluvJuliusBorisov
  • TressetTresset Member, Moderator Posts: 8,154
    Naten said:

    Tresset said:

    joluv No... I suppose in a physical sense I am a human, but in a mental sense I sometimes believe I am something else. Perhaps an uncommon sub species of human, I don't know...

    Any thing specific to make you feel this way?? Very curious.
    I am autistic.

    Naten
  • NatenNaten Member Posts: 138
    edited April 2015
    I understand. I have a friend with autism and I know how difficult that can make things sometimes. Well I won't claim to know you very well but from what I do know you have a good respect and love for animals and a willingness to help others if you can (helped me one time :smile: ). Which is more than I can say for many of the common species of humans running around being selfish pricks and prickesses (prickesses is a word don't argue with me spellcheck). Being uncommon is always a good thing in my opinion. I would not consider myself of the common species of humans either and would not want to be ( I am a strange one for sure but I won't get into that at the moment) . The majority of humanity is insane, they are demolishing the rain-forests, poisoning the oceans, polluting the air. They live as if they are the last generation on this planet..

    mlneveseJuliusBorisov
  • mlnevesemlnevese Member, Moderator Posts: 10,151
    edited April 2015
    I was just about to say the same as @Naten. The more I live, the more I get disappointed by humanity in general. The occasional exception just proves the rule. If humanity was good as a rule a good action would not go in the news.

    Post edited by mlnevese on
    JuliusBorisovNaten
  • Fiendish_WarriorFiendish_Warrior Member Posts: 309
    Human excellence is not a given; it's an achievement.

    NatenCrevsDaakSmilingSword
  • the_spyderthe_spyder Member Posts: 5,018
    Naten said:

    I like this idea, although I still buy books from the store all the time so admitting to once stealing from them would make future purchases extremely ... awkward. I will likely go for the giving money to a good charity idea instead, children's hospital could probably make better use of the money than a Massive book store franchise anyways (still feel bad for cheating the writers and artists of the books though). Thanks for the interesting idea.

    Charity is always a good option.

    If the store is a chain store, nothing would prevent you from sending a check or money order to the corporate office with an explanation. That might save you the awkward moments when you go back. Even if you were to send it anonymously, that would at least resolve the financial component. Another option would be to simply buy the books again (or whatever the equivalent is today) and then donate the books to a local library.

    joluvNaten
  • NatenNaten Member Posts: 138
    @the_spyder those are definitely excellent ideas, thank you. I really like the donating to the library and buying the books again one.

  • Son_of_ImoenSon_of_Imoen Member Posts: 1,802
    Naten said:

    The majority of humanity is insane, they are demolishing the rain-forests, poisoning the oceans, polluting the air. They live as if they are the last generation on this planet..

    That's what I'm thinking too. Is it me that has a mental illness, making this world unbearable for me, or is this world unbearable because the rest of humanity is insane?

    mlneveseNatenSmilingSword
  • mlnevesemlnevese Member, Moderator Posts: 10,151
    @Son_of_Imoen In my case, I believe both are true...

    Naten
  • Fiendish_WarriorFiendish_Warrior Member Posts: 309


    That's what I'm thinking too. Is it me that has a mental illness, making this world unbearable for me, or is this world unbearable because the rest of humanity is insane?

    It might even be a kind of programmed biological response. As we grow older, we dislike more and more so that, when the body begins undergoing the death process, you're already ready to check out. Of course, I don't necessarily believe that, but I've heard it proposed.

    Naten
  • mlnevesemlnevese Member, Moderator Posts: 10,151


    That's what I'm thinking too. Is it me that has a mental illness, making this world unbearable for me, or is this world unbearable because the rest of humanity is insane?

    It might even be a kind of programmed biological response. As we grow older, we dislike more and more so that, when the body begins undergoing the death process, you're already ready to check out. Of course, I don't necessarily believe that, but I've heard it proposed.
    I don't particularly believe that. It's just that the more we live, the more we see how people actually behave. Eventually you get tired of trying to change the world...

    dunbarJuliusBorisov
  • TheElfTheElf Member Posts: 798
    simples said:

    I found some guy's wallet in El Segundo once

    I left mine there in 1990. Can I have it back?

  • joluvjoluv Member Posts: 2,136
    I don't know why you guys dislike people so much. Sure, humanity as a group is destructive, but as individuals most people aren't so bad.

  • Son_of_ImoenSon_of_Imoen Member Posts: 1,802
    edited April 2015


    That's what I'm thinking too. Is it me that has a mental illness, making this world unbearable for me, or is this world unbearable because the rest of humanity is insane?

    It might even be a kind of programmed biological response. As we grow older, we dislike more and more so that, when the body begins undergoing the death process, you're already ready to check out. Of course, I don't necessarily believe that, but I've heard it proposed.
    Except I have that feeling since I'm 19, so no, it's not a response to getting older. But like @mlnevese said, I guess both are true. It doesn't feel normal that even the tweeting of a bird or the bright colors of a flower can cause over-stimulation of my senses and doing something fun like a day's out causes tiredness and depression for one to three days afterwards.

  • Fiendish_WarriorFiendish_Warrior Member Posts: 309
    edited April 2015

    Except I have that feeling since I'm 19, so no, it's not a response to getting older. But like @mlnevese said, I guess both are true. It doesn't feel normal that even the tweeting of a bird or the bright colors of a flower can cause over-stimulation of my senses and doing something fun like a day's out causes tiredness and depression for one to three days afterwards.

    Just for transparency: I'm not committed to this idea. It's tautologous, and I'll show you why as I respond with a hypothetical defense of it to both you and mlnevese. It should be realized though that just because a theory is tautologous, it doesn't follow that it's necessarily incorrect.

    @Son_of_Imoen There are three responses that a defender of this theory could give.

    (1) An anecdote is not weighty enough to weaken the theory unless one was making the claim that it is universally true. A single counterexample from a sample of n=1 simply illustrates an exception to a general rule rather than a refutation of it.

    (2) Because you exhibit the symptoms of this biological response, it doesn't follow that there is a single cause for it. Just like a fever can be triggered from exposure to different kinds of pathogens, misanthropy too has different causes.

    (3) Age is irrelevant to a degree in the determination of biological processes starting or stopping. While it's true that grey hair and bad eyes usually accompany older age, some have hair that turns grey or eyes that go bad at very early ages (teens and twenties). Biological processes begin and end when they begin and end. For some, some of those processes start much earlier and for others much later.

    @mlnevese There are two things our hypothetical defender might say:

    (1) This is a theory not only about how we view others strictly, but life in general. This biological response is not therefore restricted to feelings of misanthropy. It might begin there (or anywhere), but with time and the acceleration of the aging processes, we will grow to dislike more and more. Colors become dull and sounds become muffled, causing us to find less and less joy in life in even the so-called simple things. It's all a slow and steady process of gradual detachment so that when the inevitable arrives, one is psychologically at peace with it.

    (2) That is just a reason that you're giving yourself, but our reasons are sometimes misleading and other times alternative descriptions of the same underlying cause. In this case, it's likely the latter. For example, a neurobiologist observes your behavioral response of anger to your friend Jones and claims, "You felt angry because a great amount of activity was generated in the areas of the amygdala and periaqueductal gray, and your response was dictated by the activity generated in the medial frontal cortex." You respond, "No. I was angry because Jones stole my stamp collection and burned it. My tackling Jones and punching him in the face was a response to hearing that he burned it." Does it follow that one of these descriptions is the "right" one and one the "wrong" one? No. They're both correct; they're also just two different kinds of description for the same observable phenomenon. In the case of misanthropy, the "programmed biological response" theory is equivalent to the neurobiological description of anger in the example above.

    As you might be beginning to see, I'm not confident that this theory is falsifiable, and that, if anything, certainly creates a serious obstacle for any aspirations it might have to be a scientific theory. This means it's kind of stuck in "faith-like status." Ultimately, either you believe or you don't.

  • mlnevesemlnevese Member, Moderator Posts: 10,151
    @Fiendish_Warrior I still do not think this is the case. I do like to live, I have nothing against modern music, etc. But the fact is that the more I learn the ore I see historical patterns repeating themselves in an endless cycle, the oppressed become the oppressor is one of the most common. Neither do I believe that all humans are evil, despicable beings. There are many people out there who are truly beautiful inside.

    But i just can't believe anymore that there is a way humanity as a collective entity will change because of those few. History just proves we still act today as we did thousands of years ago. The only thing that seems to evolve is our technology.

    JuliusBorisov
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