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Anyone knows of RPG's without humans, elves and dwarves in it?

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  • BlackbɨrdBlackbɨrd Member Posts: 287
    edited April 10
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    Post edited by Blackbɨrd on
    Kamigoroshi
  • Balrog99Balrog99 Member Posts: 7,167
    edited March 2020
  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    megamike15 wrote: »
    it's gonna be kinda hard to find an rpg that does not have humans in it. they are kinda common.

    Especially seeing how you know, humans make the games a d hu.ans are egotistical creatures who think they belong everywhere from the deepest darkest parts of hell to the very edges of the multiverse.

    Kamigoroshi
  • ThacoBellThacoBell Member Posts: 12,181
    Its not quite what was asked, but "Of Orcs and Men" has the player character as a full blood orc with a goblin companion, and humans are the villains. The orcs are still violent and tribalistic, but the humans come across as worse. Its an ARPG, and has no party mechanics, but its an interesting game.

    KamigoroshiProont
  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    @ThacoBell
    Do those despicable humans capture and do unspeakable things to orc women?

  • KamigoroshiKamigoroshi Member Posts: 5,876
    DragonKing wrote: »
    Especially seeing how you know, humans make the games a d hu.ans are egotistical creatures who think they belong everywhere from the deepest darkest parts of hell to the very edges of the multiverse.
    That's pretty much my greatest beef with most Sci-Fi franchises such as Star Wars and Star Trek: reskinned humans in every part of the galaxy... ugh! It feels so utterly lazy on all accounts. I really do wish to see more speculative evolution in depicted alien species. Humanoids begone! Bring out the crazy body shapes a' la Darwin IV!
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    Its not quite what was asked, but "Of Orcs and Men" has the player character as a full blood orc with a goblin companion, and humans are the villains. The orcs are still violent and tribalistic, but the humans come across as worse. Its an ARPG, and has no party mechanics, but its an interesting game.
    Of Orcs and Men was nice, just as its Styx off-shot franchise. Their gobs were one of the best in cideo game history. The only downsite of the creature design was that their orcs have no tusks. Orcs without tusks are like dwarves without beards. :anguished:

    Anyone got a recommendation for something akin to Nier:Automata? Like Utawarerumono, this particular JRPG features a post-apocalyptic world in where mankind died out and the planet is populated by their creations instead. Something in the same vein would also hit the spot for me.

  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    edited April 2020
    That's pretty much my greatest beef with most Sci-Fi franchises such as Star Wars and Star Trek: reskinned humans in every part of the galaxy... ugh! It feels so utterly lazy on all accounts. I really do wish to see more speculative evolution in depicted alien species. Humanoids begone! Bring out the crazy body shapes a' la Darwin IV!
    Hey Everytime I called out the over use of bipedal humanoids in sci go I get looked at as if I committed the original sin.

    But that doesn't annoy me anywhere as much as doing things such as take freaking elves and putting them on a sci go setting

  • VallmyrVallmyr Member, Mobile Tester Posts: 2,445
    But Eldar are coooool. Granted Warhammer 40k isn’t even science fiction in the slightest.

  • ThacoBellThacoBell Member Posts: 12,181
    @DragonKing Think more, "European settlers vs. Native Americans." With a smattering of the Empire from Star Wars.

    @Vallmyr "Granted Warhammer 40k isn’t even science fiction in the slightest."

    If you ignore all the sci fi, then sure, there's no sci fi. :P

  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    @DragonKing Think more, "European settlers vs. Native Americans." With a smattering of the Empire from Star Wars.

    @Vallmyr "Granted Warhammer 40k isn’t even science fiction in the slightest."

    If you ignore all the sci fi, then sure, there's no sci fi. :P
    That's kinda a large sweep because there were two empires that ultimately colonized the Americas, Spain and Britain. Those two powers actually treated the colonization differently, the British colonizers for the most part just wanted the land while spain also wanted to enslave the natives of the land.

    @ThacoBell

  • WarChiefZekeWarChiefZeke Member Posts: 2,626
    edited April 2020
    You can use humans in Tactics Ogre and Ogre Battle, but you can be equally viable using a party of Dragons, Golems, Lamias, Lizardmen, Faeries, Skeletons, Ghosts, Griffons, Octopi, Mermaids, Liches...

    I can't think of any RPG that is solely based around non humans though.

  • VallmyrVallmyr Member, Mobile Tester Posts: 2,445
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    @DragonKing Think more, "European settlers vs. Native Americans." With a smattering of the Empire from Star Wars.

    @Vallmyr "Granted Warhammer 40k isn’t even science fiction in the slightest."

    If you ignore all the sci fi, then sure, there's no sci fi. :P

    Well, I'm in the camp that Star Wars isn't Sci-fi. Sci-fi I always thought had an emphasis on logic and using real world tech with a few fantasy elements to explain how things work. For example Gundam is Sci-fi because it just relies on one fake element (minovsky particles) to make the setting function. Beyond that everything is explained through semi-reliable science.

    Meanwhile 40k is things work because magic, who cares about the actual technical details, thereby it's more space fantasy and less sci-fi.

    KamigoroshiZaxaresscriver
  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    Vallmyr wrote: »
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    @DragonKing Think more, "European settlers vs. Native Americans." With a smattering of the Empire from Star Wars.

    @Vallmyr "Granted Warhammer 40k isn’t even science fiction in the slightest."

    If you ignore all the sci fi, then sure, there's no sci fi. :P

    Well, I'm in the camp that Star Wars isn't Sci-fi. Sci-fi I always thought had an emphasis on logic and using real world tech with a few fantasy elements to explain how things work. For example Gundam is Sci-fi because it just relies on one fake element (minovsky particles) to make the setting function. Beyond that everything is explained through semi-reliable science.

    Meanwhile 40k is things work because magic, who cares about the actual technical details, thereby it's more space fantasy and less sci-fi.
    By that logic you can discount about 90% of sci fi as not sci fi. The key word in sci fi is not the sci but the fi aka fiction, meaning it doesn't have to make sense of use real world logic.

    ThacoBell
  • KamigoroshiKamigoroshi Member Posts: 5,876
    Vallmyr wrote: »
    Well, I'm in the camp that Star Wars isn't Sci-fi. Sci-fi I always thought had an emphasis on logic and using real world tech with a few fantasy elements to explain how things work. For example Gundam is Sci-fi because it just relies on one fake element (minovsky particles) to make the setting function. Beyond that everything is explained through semi-reliable science.

    Meanwhile 40k is things work because magic, who cares about the actual technical details, thereby it's more space fantasy and less sci-fi.
    Agreed. There seems to be a long going trend of mixing up Science Fiction with Science Fantasy amongst the fanbase. I blame Arthur C. Clarke's third law. After all he was the one who started the "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic" train-of-thought. Warhammer 40K, Spelljammer, Star Ocean, Xenosaga, Ar Tonelico, Phantasy Star and even Starfinder are all part of the Science Fantasy subgenre. Same situation with the Star Wars (Jedi) franchise and even Star Trek (the Q, Vulcan "space elf" mind melts, ect.). I'd also throw in DUNE (Bene Gesserit sisterhood) into the mix as well here.

    Science Fantasy as a rule of thumb has deeply rooted supernatural elements (espers/psionics, magic, gods, souls, ect.) ingrained into it. While Science Fiction is solely based in (more often than not "made-up") logic. In my opinion, a good Science Fiction franchise actively tries to explain the reader/watcher/gamer how their technologies work so that the consumer gets a more immersive feel of its worldbuilding.

    One of my alltime Science Fiction favourites is Seikai no Monshou / Crest of the Stars. I like how mankind genetically engineered a new kind of human exclusively for deep space travel (due to the franchise's lack of warp technology). It explains how they are biologically distinct from their creators and how they can "link" their brains directly with spaceships for somewhat of a "Dune experience" (Spacing Guild, anyone?). The "new" Abh rebelleld against their masters, build an intergalactic empire and ruled half of the known galaxy afterwards.

    Proont
  • ZaxaresZaxares Member Posts: 1,261
    Yeah, put me in the camp that prefers hard science-fiction to more flexible space fantasy. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy stuff like Star Wars or WH40K as much as the next geek, but hard science-fiction scratches a very different kind of itch. Another good example of a hard sci-fi setting is Mass Effect (although the later games started to blur this line somewhat); the key differential factor between their universe and ours is the existence of the eponymous "Mass Effect", which derived from a substance called Element Zero. When an electrical current is passed through Element Zero (or eezo), an energy field is generated which alters an object's mass within the field. If the current was positive, mass is increased. If the current was negative, mass is decreased. This then opens up a whole new field of science such as near-FTL travel (achieved by using mass effect to reduce a spaceship's mass to near zero and then propelling it across space using conventional thrusters until it reaches near-light speed).

    Adam_en_tiumKamigoroshi
  • ProontProont Member Posts: 141
    There's Regions of Ruin.
    https://store.steampowered.com/app/680360/Regions_Of_Ruin/

    In that setting humans are gone, overrun by goblins and orcs. Dwarves are facing extinction. You play as a dwarf trying to create a settlement and fight off the goblinoids.

    Kamigoroshi
  • DhariusDharius Member Posts: 483
    edited April 2020
    No, it’s impossible to have an RPG without dwarves and elves, and halflings, oh and humans in it...

    I absolutely forbid such things to occur :)

    There

    PS I personally believe that Clarke was right, and that Sci Fi and Fantasy ARE indistinguishable and are one and the same. I really don’t care what anyone says to the contrary, neither, so ner

    Post edited by Dharius on
    KamigoroshiProont
  • ThacoBellThacoBell Member Posts: 12,181
    @DragonKing I mean, the British settlers DID start a very effective genocide of Native Americans.

    @Vallmyr Ah, elitist gate keeping. Science Fiction has always been about science that is beyond what is possible, contemporary with the work. "Science Fantasy" was a term that was invented later by, wait for it, people who only liked one style. Its a literary equivalent of music elitism.

    DragonKing
  • VallmyrVallmyr Member, Mobile Tester Posts: 2,445
    Oh I didn’t mean to come off as that, I should I mention I prefer space fantasy to sci-fi, though my terms were probably influenced by friends who are Elitists @[email protected]

    ThacoBell
  • KamigoroshiKamigoroshi Member Posts: 5,876
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    "Science Fantasy" was a term that was invented later by, wait for it, people who only liked one style. Its a literary equivalent of music elitism.
    It's more about artistic freedom of expression than anything. Like many other hybrid subgenres, the term Science Fantasy saw its birth through pulp fiction magazines from the early 1940's. And while there were authors who previously mish and mashed Science with Fantasy before, it didn't really pick up until the 40's~50's. The term itself is about as elitist as Grimdark or Sword & Sorcery. I have no negative feeling towards any of them.
    Dharius wrote: »
    No, it’s impossible to have an RPG without dwarves and elves, and halflings, oh and humans in it...

    I absolutely forbid such things to occur :)

    There

    PS I personally believe that Clarke was right, and that Sci Fi and Fantasy ARE indistinguishable and are one and the same. I really don’t care what anyone says to the contrary, neither, so ner
    #*2"$%§! *throws salt at @Dharius *
    :p

    DhariusZaxares
  • DhariusDharius Member Posts: 483
    @Kamigoroshi yeah I know the truth hurts. Luckily I quite like salt.

  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    edited April 2020
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    @DragonKing I mean, the British settlers DID start a very effective genocide of Native Americans.
    Yes, because they wanted the land genocide wasn't the ends, genocide was a means to that end and it also wasn't even the first means to get it.

    In fact the the first attempt of British colonization, the group who would more than likely to actually choose such an action first actually died a horrible death in the new world as they were part of the upper echelon of British society and didn't know wtf they were doing which is was they actually tried to establish a colony in a effing swamp.

    The second wave of colonizers, the ones that were actually successfully were actually things like debtors, poor, and those prosecuted for their religion by the dominate religion of britan at the time and wanted to go to the new world for religious freedom... We all saw how well that one worked out.

    And during this time the early days of colonization mant of the early colonizers actually did have... Latest say a working relationship with some of the natives. Not all as nothing is ever black and white. But the genocide didn't come til later.


    But my point was the genocide was a terrible biproduct to achieve a goal. Not the primary objective of the British colonization. Not one I agree with in the slightest.
    It's more about artistic freedom of expression than anything. Like many other hybrid subgenres, the term Science Fantasy saw its birth through pulp fiction magazines from the early 1940's. And while there were authors who previously mish and mashed Science with Fantasy before, it didn't really pick up until the 40's~50's. The term itself is about as elitist as Grimdark or Sword & Sorcery. I have no negative feeling towards any of them.
    @Kamigoroshi
    It's not the term or it's creation that makes it elitist, it's the use of it elitist, it's the attempt of trying to seperate it from the major or core genre that it belongs to that ties the elitism to it.

  • KamigoroshiKamigoroshi Member Posts: 5,876
    edited April 2020
    DragonKing wrote: »
    @Kamigoroshi
    It's not the term or it's creation that makes it elitist, it's the use of it elitist, it's the attempt of trying to seperate it from the major or core genre that it belongs to that ties the elitism to it.
    To me it's but a matter of personal taste and not elitism per se. The various subgenres do exists: both authors and consumers use them equally around the globe. This of course also means that some of the subgenre styles will be more enjoyable than others for some. For instance, Dark Fantasy scratches my "fantasy" itch way better than Tolkien's Heroic Fantasy will ever do. Just as I like Dieselpunk far less than either Steam- or Biopunk.

    Not like any of that is very relevant to my ever growing quest of seeking out more games without humans or classical demihumans in it, of course. The only subgenres which I have absolutely zero interest in is Contemporary Fantasy and Urban Fantasy. Not a Persona gamer myself, at all. *shrugs*

  • ZaxaresZaxares Member Posts: 1,261
    DragonKing wrote: »
    It's not the term or it's creation that makes it elitist, it's the use of it elitist, it's the attempt of trying to seperate it from the major or core genre that it belongs to that ties the elitism to it.

    I do see your point and acknowledge that there are people who do attempt to gate-keep or hold themselves "above the masses" by way of this, although like Kamigoroshi I think this is the fault of the people themselves, not the attempt to further categorize science-fiction. The categories CAN help direct new fans to specific sub-genres they might enjoy; as Kami points out, stuff like "grimdark" fantasy (most recently popularized by the Witcher series) or Sword and Sorcery (Robert E. Howard's "Conan the Barbarian" is probably the best-known example of this style of fantasy. Both heroes and villains tend to be larger than life, and adventures tend to involve gods, ancient mythological monsters, primeval demons and Things That Should Not Be.) Both styles of fantasy fiction have very different atmospheres and feels when compared to High Fantasy stories like D&D.

    I feel that the problem comes when people try to claim that a particular sub-genre is more "pure" or "better" than the others, thus pitting the different genres and fans against each other when really there's nothing to compete over. Maybe you'll wind up liking some genres, but not others, or maybe you'll like them all, but for different reasons. It's not much different than, say, music fans insisting that rap/metal/classical is superior to other types, or sports fans turning up their noses at tennis/basketball/soccer and claiming that they're not REAL sports. You get these kinds of people in all fandoms; these days, I just shrug and tune them out. I know what I enjoy, and I don't need them spoiling my enjoyment. :P

    KamigoroshiProont
  • PsicoVicPsicoVic Member Posts: 829
    In the Disgaea games there are humans, but those are the enemies, I do not know if it would please you.

    You command some kind of demons, lizardmen, undead and the like.

    In Iratus: lord of the dead you command an army of undead fighting human, elven and dwarven heroes too.

    Kamigoroshi
  • KamigoroshiKamigoroshi Member Posts: 5,876
    PsicoVic wrote: »
    In the Disgaea games there are humans, but those are the enemies, I do not know if it would please you.
    Yeah, the Disgaea franchise is a real classic. I already have all parts on console. :)

    One upcoming game I personally found to fit my criterias pretty well is Arboria. There's also some footage of the PAX demo floating around. Looks like players will take control of a plant/giant/fey-like race. The game's creature design feels satisfiying alien to me and quickly caught my interest. It gets bonus points from me for being an Dark Fantasy action RPG. Hopefully it will release soon!

  • PsicoVicPsicoVic Member Posts: 829
    Dunno, The COVID delayed many schedules, not only in gaming, but I read about the game too, and it seems that could help me too to scratch a particular gaming itch I have.

  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    @Zaxares
    Oh I know, believe me I know I am from the hip hop community... And how I got tired of explaining how rap is no different from other genres of music, in fact rock and rap share many strong similarities and ties to one another and like literally every other genre of music, rap has its own sub genres and chances are most people have only heard 2, gangster and materialistic since those quickly became the most popular and constantly got played ignoring many of the other genres such as conscious rap, horror core rap, abstract rap, political rap, street rap ,and so on.

    Non ironically enough, the same thing exist in the art world. Alot of people don't realize that there is a divise between commercial art (illustrations, graphic designs, etc) and Fine art (painting, sculpting etc...) Worlds with the later not viewing the earlier as "real art.", Why you ask? Because, "you're not painting what you feel or think bit painting someone else's ideas, thoughts, and feelings". Which is quite ironic seeing how much of the classical art we study today is literally commission art.

    Zaxares
  • ThacoBellThacoBell Member Posts: 12,181
    @DragonKing "Yes, because they wanted the land genocide wasn't the ends, genocide was a means to that end and it also wasn't even the first means to get it."

    The reason doesn't matter. Genocide is Genocide.

    @Kamigoroshi My issue with the term, is that it was first coined by people who didn't think "realistic" sci-fi was real sci-fi. Heck, the oldest sci-fi stories were written before we had any real knowledge of what space or other planets were actually like. If anything, the more unrealistic stories should be labelled as "Sci-Fi" while the more grounded stuff is just fiction.

  • DragonKingDragonKing Member Posts: 1,912
    ThacoBell wrote: »
    @DragonKing "Yes, because they wanted the land genocide wasn't the ends, genocide was a means to that end and it also wasn't even the first means to get it."

    The reason doesn't matter. Genocide is Genocide.
    Incorrect, the reason is just as important as the means, if you don't understand why something happens then your doomed to just repeat it. Too man people want to ignore the why and just focus on the what.

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