Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Categories

New Premium Module: Tyrants of the Moonsea! Read More
Attention, new and old users! Please read the new rules of conduct for the forums, and we hope you enjoy your stay!

What book(s) are you reading right now?

1235»

Comments

  • jethrojethro Member Posts: 81
    Sylph said:

    I'm currently reading 'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss, although I can't say I'm terribly impressed with it.

    Try to get through at least half the book...I found the first half is interesting, but a little slow too. It's the second half that really shines - and worth the wait!

    Oxford_Guy
  • Oxford_GuyOxford_Guy Member Posts: 3,729
    jethro said:

    Sylph said:

    I'm currently reading 'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss, although I can't say I'm terribly impressed with it.

    Try to get through at least half the book...I found the first half is interesting, but a little slow too. It's the second half that really shines - and worth the wait!
    Agreed! It's superb and the sequel is even better!

  • VnavekulVnavekul Member Posts: 170
    Dragon Age: Asunder. I (secretly) really like the first two books in that series. :3

  • Oxford_GuyOxford_Guy Member Posts: 3,729
    edited February 2013
    BTW I've just noticed that quite a few of the Forgotten Realms books are *finally* available for Kindle in the UK on Amazon, which of these are actually any good and worth reading? I heard that the quality is variable. I was thinking of maybe starting with "Homeland: The Legend of Drizzt, Book I" by R. A. Salvatore (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002DOSBMK/ ), but would also be interested to read some non-Drizzt stuff, what else is good? Who else is worth reading apart from R. A. Salvatore? Would mostly be interested in fairly "canon" Faerûn stuff.

    Is "Elminster: Making of a Mage" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Elminster-Making-Forgotten-Realms-ebook/dp/B00513DGXY/ ) by Ed Greenwood worth reading?

  • deltagodeltago Member Posts: 7,036
    Just finished Chocolate Wars by Deborah Cadbury.
    Also recently finished Brother's Grimm.
    3/4th the way through Oliver Twist.

  • Oxford_GuyOxford_Guy Member Posts: 3,729

    BTW I've just noticed that quite a few of the Forgotten Realms books are *finally* available for Kindle in the UK on Amazon, which of these are actually any good and worth reading? I heard that the quality is variable. I was thinking of maybe starting with "Homeland: The Legend of Drizzt, Book I" by R. A. Salvatore (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002DOSBMK/ ), but would also be interested to read some non-Drizzt stuff, what else is good? Who else is worth reading apart from R. A. Salvatore? Would mostly be interested in fairly "canon" Faerûn stuff.

    Is "Elminster: Making of a Mage" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Elminster-Making-Forgotten-Realms-ebook/dp/B00513DGXY/ ) by Ed Greenwood worth reading?

    Has anyone read "Unclean: The Haunted Lands, Book I" (Forgotten Realms: The Haunted Lands, Book 1) by Richard Lee Byers (see: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Unclean-Haunted-Forgotten-Realms-ebook/dp/B00357PU4Q/ )?

    It sounds very promising, there's even a subplot about a Bard, apparently :-)

    Ixtabai
  • IxtabaiIxtabai Member Posts: 23
    Currently reading: Natsume Sôseki's "Kokoro" (in English translation), Roger Scruton's "Green Philosophy", José Rizal's "Noli Me Tangere" (English trans. but I am also referring to original Spanish text), and Edouard Glissant's "Caribbean Discourse". No, these are not all reading for pleasure... :( But they are all pretty different and interesting books nonetheless.

    ... Who else is worth reading apart from R. A. Salvatore? Would mostly be interested in fairly "canon" Faerûn stuff.

    Is "Elminster: Making of a Mage" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Elminster-Making-Forgotten-Realms-ebook/dp/B00513DGXY/ ) by Ed Greenwood worth reading?

    ...
    I remember reading Greenwood's Spellfire, which I enjoyed for all the info it gave on Elminster. It featured some of Elminster's battle-tactics that made him look quite clever. But I have not read that much forgotten realms stuff, however, I do know many of them are definitely not worth reading at all.

  • rexregrexreg Member Posts: 292
    i've been going throught The Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell for the first time...
    last night i started The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss...

  • MadhaxMadhax Member Posts: 1,416
    I finished "Shadows in Flight" by Orson Scott Card last night. Having thought the Ender and Bean sagas were concluded a while ago, it blew my mind to see a new book sitting on the shelf when I was browsing a book store. It was fantastic to go back to the Ender-verse again, though the book wasn't as fulfilling as some of the previous installments.

  • ImperatorImperator Member Posts: 154

    BTW I've just noticed that quite a few of the Forgotten Realms books are *finally* available for Kindle in the UK on Amazon, which of these are actually any good and worth reading? I heard that the quality is variable. I was thinking of maybe starting with "Homeland: The Legend of Drizzt, Book I" by R. A. Salvatore (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002DOSBMK/ ), but would also be interested to read some non-Drizzt stuff, what else is good? Who else is worth reading apart from R. A. Salvatore? Would mostly be interested in fairly "canon" Faerûn stuff.

    Is "Elminster: Making of a Mage" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Elminster-Making-Forgotten-Realms-ebook/dp/B00513DGXY/ ) by Ed Greenwood worth reading?

    If your interested in Elminster, then by all means read the books, just don't expect spectacular writing, IMO Greenwood has a tendency to rush a bit.

  • FoodgeekFoodgeek Member Posts: 12
    I loved the original Amber books. The one's with Corwin, not Merle. Aso a fan of G RR Martin.

    I recently finished two new releases, Imager's Battalion (Modesitt) and the last Wheel of Time (Jordan) book. I just picked up Flinx Transcendant, but am already bored. I have a copy of Holt's Blonde Bombshell (sci fi humor?) handy, so may switch to that. I'm also a few book's into Simon R Greene's Drood series (James Bond satire in a scifi/fantasy setting).

    -Jason
    www.dcfud.com

    Soooo, while we wait for preload/release day... What are you guys reading currently? How is that going for you?

    Currently, I am reading the "Chronicles of Amber" by Roger Zelazny, and "The Saint" by Dan Abnett. On my fiance's Nook tablet, I am reading "Clash of Kings" by George R. R. Martin.

    I am a pretty slow reader, so I've been working on these for a few months. I took a break on The Saint and Clash of Kings while I work on Amber. I read about halfway through these chronicles several years ago, but never finished it. I'm giving it another go right now, and I'm fascinated by the concept of reality travel.

    I don't remember where I'm at on Clash of Kings, but it's just after the intro with Melisandra.

    I haven't read The Saint in a while, but last I left off, the Ghosts were iinvading a fuel refinery that had been taken over by Chaos forces. I should pick that up again... Abnett is one of my favorite writers. I'm in love with his writing style, ever since I plowed though Eisenhorn and Ravenor.

  • atcDaveatcDave Member Posts: 1,933
    Currently reading "Fortress Against the Rising Sun: The Role of the B-17 in the Pacific" by Gene Eric Saleker. Am I the only one here who doesn't read fiction much?

    Moomintroll
  • YovanethYovaneth Member Posts: 682
    edited March 2013
    The 'Saxon Chronicles' series by Bernard Cornwell. I don't think that guy could write a bad book if he tried - his research is absolutely meticulous. I've already read the 'Grail Quest' series, 'Sharpe' series and a few standalones (such as 'Azincourt').

    @atcDave I run about two-thirds fiction/one-third non-fiction but my preferred fiction is based on factual events. Unless it's pure space opera!!

    Anduin
  • atcDaveatcDave Member Posts: 1,933
    Yovaneth said:

    The 'Saxon Chronicles' series by Bernard Cornwell. I don't think that guy could write a bad book if he tried - his research is absolutely meticulous. I've already read the 'Grail Quest' series, 'Sharpe' series and a few standalones (such as 'Azincourt').

    @atcDave I run about two-thirds fiction/one-third non-fiction but my preferred fiction is based on factual events. Unless it's pure space opera!!

    I do like good historical fiction (Stephen Lawhead comes to mind), but I think I'm at about 9 to 1 history to fiction.
    I think the last actual fantasy I read was Lord of the Rings! I loved it, but it inspired me to read about English history not other fantasy.

    And errr, I'm familiar with "The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles" as primary source material for early medieval English History (Alfred the Great era). I'm guessing there's a connection?

  • AnduinAnduin Member Posts: 5,745
    Bernard Cornwell is an awesome author.

    However I am currently reading (I read about 5 books on the go...)

    To my class at the end of the day "Stig of the dump"

    With my class together "Clockwork"

    On my phone "Lone Wolf books 1 to 5" You will not believe how good these books are on your phone... You can't cheat!

    On the bedside "Autocracy" Okay it's a transformer comic...

    In the bathroom "Fear to tread" Horus Heresy

    Although I have just read life of Pi and Gentlemen of the road.

    Gentlemen of the road is an obscure one. It is written by Michael Chabon, aparently a pulitzer prize winner, but not heard of him until I read this book.

    Life of Pi I devoured in about 4 sessions. 3 sessions taken reading the slow start of the book... 1 session after he finally gets stuck on the boat... Very good :)

  • YovanethYovaneth Member Posts: 682
    edited March 2013
    atcDave said:

    And errr, I'm familiar with "The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles" as primary source material for early medieval English History (Alfred the Great era). I'm guessing there's a connection?

    Yes; the series is set in that period, but Alfred isn't the king we all know and love...

    I also have to agree that Stephen Lawhead did an interesting job with the 'Taliesin' and 'Silver Hand' series.

    atcDave
  • rexregrexreg Member Posts: 292
    Lords of Chaos
    the rise of the Black Metal underground, primarily in Norway

    Aristillius
Sign In or Register to comment.