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  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited October 2017
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    Skatan
  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,455
    @Shandaxx Clearly the third one is an unfortunate reference to Nazi Germany
    [Deleted User]lolien
  • AnduinAnduin Member Posts: 5,745
    Sentence number 2) Obviously a sentence uttered when planning an ice-cream heist.

    Sentence number 4) makes sense. Horses will always follow the carrot. They love carrots.

    Sentence 1) A sentence made by a youth explaining his whereabouts during a night out. The razors being a fashionable night club.
    [Deleted User]lolien
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    Skatan
  • AnduinAnduin Member Posts: 5,745
    Shandaxx said:

    See, @Aedan, was it that hard? Now all the sentences make sense :)

    Can't wait to commit an ice-cream heist when I'm in Italy!

    The Italian job.
    [Deleted User]FinneousPJlolienelminster
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
    MirandelSkatan
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited October 2017
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    Post edited by [Deleted User] on
    lolienSkatan
  • AedanAedan Member, Translator (NDA) Posts: 8,544
    edited October 2017
    @Shandaxx
    That is why you should show some respect to the Sailor Warriors!
    SethDavis
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited October 2017
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    FinneousPJSkatan
  • AedanAedan Member, Translator (NDA) Posts: 8,544
    Shandaxx said:

    Btw I am very disappointed with the Italian words for "Saturday" and "Sunday".

    I mean even in English it's clear now, Saturday referencing Saturn and Sunday obviously the sun.

    But that is NOT what the Italian names "sabato" and "domenica" stand for.

    That's because both words have a different meaning. Check it out and you will understand.
    [Deleted User]
  • elminsterelminster Member, Developer Posts: 16,305
    Shandaxx said:

    Look at that! Jupiter translates to "Giove"... But... in Italian Thursday means "giovedì".
    So there is "giove" in "giovedì".

    In Italian "Thursday" literally is the day of Jupiter O_o

    And it's not like "Thursday" has nothing to do with this. Thursday seems to be "Thor's day". According to the link Jupiter was identified with Thor.

    I would have never noticed this in English alone.

    Edit:
    This goes further than I would have expected...

    Lunedì - Monday- "Day of the Moon"
    Martedì - Tuesday - "Day of Mars"
    Mercoledì - Wednesday - "Day of Mercury"
    Giovedì - Thursday - "Day of Jupiter"
    Venerdì - Friday - "Day of Venus"

    Not surprisingly (given they are both romantic languages) French is similar to this.

    lundi - Monday
    mardi - Tuesday
    mercredi - Wednesday
    jeudi -Thursday
    vendredi - Friday
    [Deleted User]
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
    FinneousPJlolienSkatan
  • AedanAedan Member, Translator (NDA) Posts: 8,544
    Nonsense.
    [Deleted User]
  • dreamtravelerdreamtraveler Member Posts: 377
    i have found a very nice site for french http://bit.ly/2v7RXFj
    [Deleted User]
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited January 2018
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    JoenSoSkatan
  • RaduzielRaduziel Member Posts: 4,714
    edited January 2018
    Duolingo is great, I often use this software. I learned English and Spanish by myself and my next target is French.

    A great way to increase your knowledge about a language is reading newspaper in the language you want to learn.
    [Deleted User]
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited January 2018
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    RaduzielSkatan
  • Italian, that's nothing. Lots of it are cognates with Latin (duh), the Romance languages (duh), and English (because European history). For a challenge, try Finnish. That'll make your head spin and your teeth fall out.
    lolien
  • RaduzielRaduziel Member Posts: 4,714
    Shandaxx said:

    @Raduziel

    Are you using Duolingo at the moment? I was on a break, but I'm back now.

    So we could add each other to see our progress. My nick on Duolingo is "BeaverGuy", what's yours?
    Please feel free to add me :)

    I deleted my Facebook account and got locked out of my Duolingo account - changed my phone recently and made a new one.

    Will add you today :)
    [Deleted User]
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
    AedanSkatanlolien
  • FinneousPJFinneousPJ Member Posts: 6,455

    Italian, that's nothing. Lots of it are cognates with Latin (duh), the Romance languages (duh), and English (because European history). For a challenge, try Finnish. That'll make your head spin and your teeth fall out.

    I learned Finnish when I was only two years old. Didn't even have a teacher. Obviously it's very easy!
    Shandaxx said:

    Italian, that's nothing. Lots of it are cognates with Latin (duh), the Romance languages (duh), and English (because European history). For a challenge, try Finnish. That'll make your head spin and your teeth fall out.

    For me a huge part is motivation. I need to develop a passion for the language I'm learning otherwise I couldn't learn it. While I'm learning a new language I also do fall further "in love" with it, but I cannot fall in love with just any language.

    It also helps if I have some kind - any kind - of connection to that language. For example knowing a charming, handsome Italian is a huge motivation in learning Italian for me.

    Maybe the same would work for Finnish, but I don't know so many people from Finland.
    @FinneousPJ how sexy and charming would you consider yourself?
    @Shandaxx Oh, extremely -- I find I am pushing the boundary on both accounts.

    Maybe you could try some Finnish music or reading about our national epic, the Kalevala. Apparently Tolkien was obsessed with Finnish. The Quenya Elvish is based on Finnish, and the story of Turin Turambar is straight from the Kalevala.
    [Deleted User]lolien
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited January 2018
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    FinneousPJAedanSkatanlolien
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited February 2018
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    Post edited by [Deleted User] on
    FinneousPJlolienAedan
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    FinneousPJlolien
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited March 2018
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    FinneousPJlolien
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited March 2018
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    FinneousPJlolien
  • JoenSoJoenSo Member Posts: 910
    When I started learning Spanish in school they never bothered to tell us just how many tenses and moods there were. I guess they thought it would scare us away when we were still beginners. So I was introduced to them gradually over the years. Felt like something out of a cartoon where someone already carries loads of stuff but someone else keeps stacking additional stuff on the top.
    "....and the condicional compuesto! ..and the pretérito pluscuamperfecto! And..."
    "Oh come on!"
    [Deleted User]
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
    Nimranlolien
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